!!> Ebook ➩ Stormy Applause ➪ Author Rostislav Dubinsky – Writerscompany.co.uk

Stormy Applause Though Written Remarkably Well And Full Of Brave, Defiant Flashes Of Wit And Humor, This Is A Sad And Haunting Book Dubinsky Was The Founder And For Years The First Violinist Of The Borodin String Quartet, One Of The Supreme Ensembles Of Its Kind Here He Describes A Musician S Life Under A Totalitarian Regime The Soul Destroying Restrictions And Constant Dangers, Exacerbated By A Pervasive Anti Semitism Officially Illegal But Actively Encouraged And Ruthlessly Practiced By The Authorities The Quartet S Original Players Were All Jews, Though The Cellist Was A Half Jew Who Passed As Russian The Second Violinist And Violist Were Eventually Replaced By Russians Dubinsky Was The Artistic Director In Charge Of Rehearsals And Musical Decisions, But The Quartet S Activities, Including The Members Personal Interrelationships, Were Completely Dominated By Politics And Indeed So Is The Narrative Dubinsky Only Rarely Talks About Music, Though Always Movingly And With Insight, And Never Explains How The Group Attained Its GreatnessCertain Scenes Stand Out Stalin S And Prokofiev S Deaths On The Same Day Vignettes Of Russia S Greatest Musicians, Such As Shostakovich Whose Quartets They Played , Oistrakh, Richter, And Rostropovich The Group S Tours Abroad, Affording The First, Overwhelmingly Tempting Glimpse Of Freedom An Anti Russian Demonstration In Cincinnati, Defused When Dubinsky Confronted The Crowd And The Cellist S Near Fatal Automobile Accident In California Ever Present Is The Paralyzing Fear Of The Mercenary, Soulless Russian Bureaucracy Dubinsky Emigrated To America In , Formed The Borodin Trio With His Wife, Pianist Luba Edina, And Was Chairman Of The Chamber Music Department At Indiana University Until His Death Not Long AgoEdith Eisler This made for a quick and relatively enlightening read light in its literary form but rather heavy in its content Written by the 1st violinist of the Borodin Quartet, the work provides an eyewitness account of the musical community under the Soviet regime, emphasizing the artistic constraint and prevalent anti Semitism of the time It gives an illuminating view into the mind of a chamber musician, and it holds several interesting anecdotes about other famous, Russian musicians one such about This made for a quick and relatively enlightening read light in its literary form but rather heavy in its content Written by the 1st violinist of the Borodin Quartet, the work provides an eyewitness account of the musical community under the Soviet regime, emphasizing the artistic constraint and prevalent anti Semitism of the time It gives an illuminating view into the mind of a chamber musician, and it holds several interesting anecdotes about other famous, Russian musicians one such about Shostakovich is rather well known While I enjoyed the book for its musical and psychological insight, it is no literary masterpiece, and its historicity seems a little dubious The work is presented mostly in dialogue, which is somewhat problematic given that the book itself spans decades There are also some tropes throughout the work which seem to typify the writer and his colleagues beyond plausible realism While it is written by an eyewitness, there is an appropriately Russian saying He lies like an eyewitness, and, while I do not accuse Mr Dubinsky of intentionally changing his recollections, I would pose that the work is best appreciated for its themes rather than its details


About the Author: Rostislav Dubinsky

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Stormy Applause book, this is one of the most wanted Rostislav Dubinsky author readers around the world.


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